Learning Chinese in Beijing? – Top tips on renting a flat –Part 2

(This is the second post on renting a flat. You can find the first post here.) So, you have successfully negotiated a contract, got the keys, moved your stuff in, and registered with the police. Now what?

Renting a flat – Paying for Utilities 

Gas and electric both require to be purchased in advance. Each has a separate card that you will need to make sure is provided for you by your landlord or rental agency. It’s a good idea to check on both the gas and electric meter as to how much credit there is on the cards (Sometimes this will be done by the agent when you move in, as they may want to charge you for this, especially if there is a large credit). If the credit is low, then you will probably want to go and buy more credits sooner rather than later (or risk your shower going cold, or your dinner being half cooked!)

 

Beijing gas meter

Beijing gas meter, generally found in the kitchen

Gas

Your gas meter is likely to be inside your own apartment and so should be easy to find. The available credit will be clearly displayed. Gas can be purchased from the Bank of Beijing (if you have a Chinese bankcard from any bank then you can use their 24 hour self service machines. If you do not have a Chinese bankcard, you will need to queue up and pay over the counter). Gas can also be purchased from designated selling offices (ask your agent or a friend for the location of the one in your area). You need to insert your card into the gas meter for it to register your account, then within 24 hours you can go buy the gas. The easiest way is just to insert the card into the machine immediately before you head out and then reinsert the card into the meter as soon as you return to add your gas credits. Most meters also have batteries that occasionally need to be replaced. Generally speaking, if your gas isn’t flowing when the meter still shows you have credits, then the culprit is likely dead batteries.

 

Beijing Electricity meter

Your electic meter is usually in the corridor outside your flat. Insert your card to find out much credit you have left.

Electric

Electric meters can be a little trickier – they are almost always outside the apartment, and often are grouped together, so the key thing is to work out which one is yours. The suggestion from the official website  is: Way to check the meter of your house: turn off the switch of the meter, if the power in your house goes off means that the meter is connected with your house. I just successfully tried this with ours, and found the switches are in a little box under the meters. However, if you have to try quite a few before you work out which is yours, this may give you some unhappy neighbours, so another suggestion is to turn on your air-conditioning and see which meter starts using more electric. (There is a little red light on the right of the credit display, which flashes ever faster as your electricity consumption goes up. Incidentally, the display will only show numbers constantly once your credit is less than 200, to find out how much credit you have if there are no numbers, just put the card into the machine with the chip facing outwards) Electric can be purchased from many of the banks, including: Bank of China, Bank of Beijing, and Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (ICBC). It can also be purchased from any sale outlet of Beijing Electric Power Corporation. Again, you need to insert your card into the machine before you go. Note – you can only top up the electric when it is below 200kWH. The Beijing governments official English website has info on buying electric and is actually pretty useful.

 

Beijing gas and electricity cards

You need to make sure your landlord gives you the relevent cards for putting credit on your electricity and gas meters

Tap Water

Water is the simplest – as it is not pre-pay but is billed by actual usage. Once every two months or so, someone will come round to read the water meter and tell you how much to pay. I have always just paid them directly as this saves a trip to the bank. Previously I know people were sometimes nervous to do this in case the worker just pocketed the money, but they have recently introduced a new system, which means you get an electronic receipt from the person when you pay them (which you can then keep to prove to your landlord that you have paid, just in case they try to charge you!) If you see anything we have missed, please use the comments below to share your experience of renting a flat in Beijing. Our final post should be out in a couple of days, which will include advice on what you need to be aware of at the start so that your eventual leaving process is less stressful.

This entry was posted in Chinese Culture, Living in Beijing and tagged , by Jonny. Bookmark the permalink.

About Jonny

Jonny Willson came to Beijing in December 2010 and studied Chinese at 1on1Mandarin 2 years before beginning to work there. His background is in Maths and Analysis (Oxford University, followed by a PhD in Edinburgh (Heriot-Watt University)), and was previously a Credit Risk Analyst with the Royal Bank of Scotland. In his free time he likes to read, watch films, play badminton and run.