Learning Chinese in Beijing? – Top tips on renting a flat (Part 1 of 3)

Mid August onwards is the time when many international students start to arrive in Beijing to begin a semester or two of Chinese studies. If your language school or university doesn’t provide accommodation (or if what is on offer there is not what you are looking for), how do you go about renting a flat i.e finding somewhere decent, at a price that suits you and with a landlord that is helpful? What are some of the key things that you need to know to make sure you are all above board, fulfilling all the regulations? What can help you have a smooth transition into actually living in your own place, and what do you need to know at the start that will make it easier when you leave?

Part one in this mini series will look at some of the key things to think about when first looking for, and negotiating a place to rent. Part two will consider things to think about after you have moved in. Part three will help you think about what you are going need to be ready for when you eventually move out.

Firstly, we’d like to point you to a great article that was posted towards the end of July 2013, which gives a really good overview of most of the things you should be aware of when trying to find a place to rent in Beijing/China. http://www.saporedicina.com/english/rent-in-beijing/

One important point to note: it is good to be aware that things here in China have a tendency to change FAST! So advice given this week may not be fully accurate in six months or a years’ time. However, at the time of writing this post we still feel most of the advice in the Sapore di Cina article is up to date, and some of it is pretty timeless.

A couple of things that the article does not mention, or only mentions briefly, are also important to consider.

renting a flat in wudaokou

The modern Huaqingjiayuan housing complex is right next door to our language school 1on1Mandarin

Registration

It is mandatory for all foreigners to register at their local police office within 24 hours of arriving in the country. If you stay in university accommodation or a hotel, this will be done for you. However, if you are renting a place, you will need to personally make sure you register. There is a fine of up to 500RMB for not registering. Previously there was often a degree of leniency in the time, however, over the summer of 2012 there was a significant crackdown on foreigners living in Beijing, and since then the rules are being enforced much more stringently. (Having said that, different local police offices do still have different practices!)

The Practicalities

In order to register you will first need to go to the correct local police office. In theory your landlord should accompany you the first time you go, and if this is the case, then registration should go smoothly. However, if your landlord is not willing to come with you, then you need to make sure that you at least know where to go! Once you get there, you will need to provide a number of documents. (This may vary slightly depending on which office you go to – again, different offices have different practices!) The minimum you will need is:

  1. Your passport, with valid Chinese visa, and date of entry stamp
  2. Your contract

Recently I have heard that you will also need to provide some sort of proof that your landlord has paid his rental tax (*more info regarding the rental tax below). This may be in the form of an official receipt, or it may be a ‘letter of invitation’ (essentially something only provided if your landlord has paid their tax). The easiest way to deal with this the first time is to insist that your landlord goes with you, and that they then provide you a copy of this document for you to use yourself on subsequent occasions.

The post below gives more detailed info as to what is required. (It doesn’t mention anything about proof of tax payment, but the article is about a year old, and this has been much more rigorously enforced recently.) http://www.themiddlekingdom.org/everything-you-need-to-know-about-residence-registration/

Rental Tax Landlords are required to pay a yearly tax of 5% of rental income. If a landlord has Chinese tenants, they will often manage to avoid paying this. However, if a landlord has ‘foreign’ tenants, then as they are required to register with the police, this makes it very difficult for the landlord to avoid paying the tax. There are numerous examples of people trying to register and being told that the 派出所 (local police office) will not register them as the landlord has not paid their tax. (We have personally experienced this twice so far.)

This blog post from last year (2012) is a good summary of this tax, and some of the pitfalls to be aware of (with some info on registration for good measure).  The key sticking point is, that although it is supposed to be the landlord who pays the tax, they often don’t want to, so will essentially ask you to pay it. If it is an apartment you like you will need to come up with some compromise for this or there is a good chance they will just rent it out to someone else. However, you do need to make sure that it is very clear in the contract that you have paid the tax, and you need to make sure that you get the appropriate receipt. Insisting that the landlord comes with you when you first register should take care of this, however, you still need to get a copy of the tax receipt as each time you leave and re-enter (or get a new visa) you may need to take it back to the police office when you register again!

Renting a flat in wudakou - cheaper option

Housing in Wudaokou – old style

Housing agents

If you are renting through an agency, which will be the case for the majority of people, it will not be uncommon to find that the owner of the property does not live in Beijing, or even if they do, they are ‘not available’. In these cases ensuring that you have an agent who can provide you with all the documentation you need is very important. Should you choose to come and study with us at 1on1 Mandarin, we have a good relationship with various housing agents that we trust, so we will be able to give you an introduction, as well as being able to help you out with some of the language difficulties you may face. Just let us know when you sign up that you would like us to help you with this.

Welcome to China! We wish you all the best in your new adventure.

Watch out for our second post on renting a flat in the next day or two, which will include advice on sorting out your utilities and how to put credit on your gas & electricity cards.

This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Living in Beijing and tagged , by Jonny. Bookmark the permalink.

About Jonny

Jonny Willson came to Beijing in December 2010 and studied Chinese at 1on1Mandarin 2 years before beginning to work there. His background is in Maths and Analysis (Oxford University, followed by a PhD in Edinburgh (Heriot-Watt University)), and was previously a Credit Risk Analyst with the Royal Bank of Scotland. In his free time he likes to read, watch films, play badminton and run.
  • Sborto

    Thank you so much for referring my article, I take note of your suggestions to improve it. ; )

  • Joel White

    Very practical articles on getting started in Beijing and probably many other cities in China. I’ve found the gas meter easy to deal with, but keep in mind that the city dept. that manages these meters will pay a visit now and then to check that the meter is working properly. If you’re not home, they will leave a notice on your door that can easily be mistaken for an advertisement. They are simply asking you to call the number and to them what the numbers are on your meter. Just another detail that could be helpful…

  • http://blog.1on1mandarin.com/ Learn Chinese Blog

    You are welcome. I enjoy reading your blog