Chinese History Podcast review

Learning Chinese history 101

We have previously mentioned on this blog the importance of understanding culture , and how understanding history is an important part of understanding culture. Having had time to listen to more of the Chinese History Podcasts by Laszlo Montgomery, then I am happy to continue to recommend the podcasts series.

There are other ways of getting up to speed on your Chinese history, but Laszlo’s easy way of narrating, depth of research, and making a story out of the details makes it a good option for me.

However, with each podcast episode being 30 minutes long, and there already being over a hundred podcasts in the series, some readers may find it helpful to be pointed to the podcasts that are particularly relevant and helpful for understanding current Chinese culture and attitudes.

 

China History Podcast Screen shot

Recommended Episodes

Of the recent podcasts I have listened to then in my opinion, the following episodes were particularly interesting

  • CHP-048 The Founding of the CCP
  • CHP-053 China in the Early 1920s
  • CHP-055 The Shanghai Massacre 1927
  • CHP-056 China and Japan 1895-1945
  • CHP 058 Sir Robert Hart

(Prior to this, Laszlo had been concentrating on doing broad Summaries of each dynasty starting with the Qin dynasty (episode 2), and finishing with the Qing Dynasty (episodes 35-41), but it is now that he is covering the events of the 20th Century that the history becomes particularly relevant. )

China history podcast on itunes

Useful lesson for language students

The episode on Sir Robert Hart contains a helpful reminder for all us language students: succeeding in China is not just about becoming fluent in the language. Sir Robert Hart succeeded where his predecessor (Horatio Nelson Lay) failed despite both these men became entirely fluent in Chinese. The key reason for this disparity is that it seems that Hart made the effort to really understand the culture and have respect for the people he was working with, which Horatio Nelson Lay failed to do.

You can listen to the full story play on iTunes, or via the China history podcast website. Let us know what you think.