Learning Chinese in Beijing? – Top tips on renting a flat – Part 3 – Preparing to leave

Learning Chinese in Beijing? – Top tips on renting a flat – Part 3 – Preparing to leave

(This is the third blog post on renting a flat. Click here for the first and second posts.)

“Why do I need to prepare to leave? But I’ve only just moved in…!”

No, I’m not confused, it actually is important to think right at the start about how you do things to ensure that your leaving process is as smooth as possible. This post came about after one of our former students told us about some of their experiences of moving away from their apartment and some of the things they wished they had known in advance!

View from Huaqingjiayuan flat in Wudaokou

Wudaokou from a Huaqingjiayuan flat.
Road noise can be an issue if your flat doesn’t have good double glazing

Drinking water

Most people arrange to have big bottles of water delivered to use with their water machine. When you first get one of these you will have to pay a deposit (probably 50RMB). You need to make sure that you keep the original receipt for this deposit, because if you don’t, when you come to leave, you won’t get your deposit back! (For further ahead; although they will deliver water, when it comes to leaving, you may need to take the bottle back to them yourself, so be sure to get their address.)

Bottled water - you don't want to drink the tap water

Unless you bring out a filter system for your tap water you will need to buy bottled water for your flat

Utilities

I mentioned this in the last post, but you should keep your receipts for gas/electric and water, so that you can prove to the landlord/agent how much you have paid.

Deposit/Contract

If you don’t already have one, getting a receipt for your deposit is a good idea so you can be sure to get back what is due. Ensuring there is a good inventory of the apartment, including a note of the overall state of the apartment, is also a good thing to do as soon when you move in. (A good rental agency should in theory have already helped you with this…) Now is also a good time to double check your contract to see if there are any ‘hidden’ clauses such as paying a tax for garbage disposal or other fees you haven’t thought of (which your landlord may try to impose on you when you leave). In theory you will have already checked this type of thing out before you sign the contract, but realistically, in the stress of getting everything done, some things may easily be missed. Local friends can be a great source for helping you understand some of the finer subtleties that us foreigners might miss! Finally, if there is nothing in the contract about extra fees being your responsibility, have made a good inventory, and you have a receipt for your deposit, and then as long as you leave the apartment in good shape you should be able to get your whole deposit back! Enjoy your stay in this great country!

One other thing to remember is that China generally deals in cash, so you need to get used to withdrawing and handling large bundles of cash.

One other thing to remember is that China generally deals in cash, so you need to get used to withdrawing and handling large bundles of cash.

Learning Chinese in Beijing? – Top tips on renting a flat –Part 2

(This is the second post on renting a flat. You can find the first post here.) So, you have successfully negotiated a contract, got the keys, moved your stuff in, and registered with the police. Now what?

Renting a flat – Paying for Utilities 

Gas and electric both require to be purchased in advance. Each has a separate card that you will need to make sure is provided for you by your landlord or rental agency. It’s a good idea to check on both the gas and electric meter as to how much credit there is on the cards (Sometimes this will be done by the agent when you move in, as they may want to charge you for this, especially if there is a large credit). If the credit is low, then you will probably want to go and buy more credits sooner rather than later (or risk your shower going cold, or your dinner being half cooked!)

 

Beijing gas meter

Beijing gas meter, generally found in the kitchen

Gas

Your gas meter is likely to be inside your own apartment and so should be easy to find. The available credit will be clearly displayed. Gas can be purchased from the Bank of Beijing (if you have a Chinese bankcard from any bank then you can use their 24 hour self service machines. If you do not have a Chinese bankcard, you will need to queue up and pay over the counter). Gas can also be purchased from designated selling offices (ask your agent or a friend for the location of the one in your area). You need to insert your card into the gas meter for it to register your account, then within 24 hours you can go buy the gas. The easiest way is just to insert the card into the machine immediately before you head out and then reinsert the card into the meter as soon as you return to add your gas credits. Most meters also have batteries that occasionally need to be replaced. Generally speaking, if your gas isn’t flowing when the meter still shows you have credits, then the culprit is likely dead batteries.

 

Beijing Electricity meter

Your electic meter is usually in the corridor outside your flat. Insert your card to find out much credit you have left.

Electric

Electric meters can be a little trickier – they are almost always outside the apartment, and often are grouped together, so the key thing is to work out which one is yours. The suggestion from the official website  is: Way to check the meter of your house: turn off the switch of the meter, if the power in your house goes off means that the meter is connected with your house. I just successfully tried this with ours, and found the switches are in a little box under the meters. However, if you have to try quite a few before you work out which is yours, this may give you some unhappy neighbours, so another suggestion is to turn on your air-conditioning and see which meter starts using more electric. (There is a little red light on the right of the credit display, which flashes ever faster as your electricity consumption goes up. Incidentally, the display will only show numbers constantly once your credit is less than 200, to find out how much credit you have if there are no numbers, just put the card into the machine with the chip facing outwards) Electric can be purchased from many of the banks, including: Bank of China, Bank of Beijing, and Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (ICBC). It can also be purchased from any sale outlet of Beijing Electric Power Corporation. Again, you need to insert your card into the machine before you go. Note – you can only top up the electric when it is below 200kWH. The Beijing governments official English website has info on buying electric and is actually pretty useful.

 

Beijing gas and electricity cards

You need to make sure your landlord gives you the relevent cards for putting credit on your electricity and gas meters

Tap Water

Water is the simplest – as it is not pre-pay but is billed by actual usage. Once every two months or so, someone will come round to read the water meter and tell you how much to pay. I have always just paid them directly as this saves a trip to the bank. Previously I know people were sometimes nervous to do this in case the worker just pocketed the money, but they have recently introduced a new system, which means you get an electronic receipt from the person when you pay them (which you can then keep to prove to your landlord that you have paid, just in case they try to charge you!) If you see anything we have missed, please use the comments below to share your experience of renting a flat in Beijing. Our final post should be out in a couple of days, which will include advice on what you need to be aware of at the start so that your eventual leaving process is less stressful.